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St Wilfrid's Catholic School

Computers themselves, and software yet to be developed, will revolutionize the way we learn.”
 Steve Jobs

Subject Leader:                      Mr M Goodman

Computing Teacher:              Mrs J Wright               

Department Website:            http://computing.stwilfrids.com/

 

Overview
In the rapidly changing world we live in, capability in Computer science and Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is an essential life skill that will enable all learners to innovate and strive towards excellence in this field.

 

Computer science and ICT are fundamental components of teaching at St Wilfrid’s School. Computing and ICT is taught as a compulsory subject to all students in Years 7, 8 and 9. As such, it is intended that all students acquire a number of transferrable skills in a broad range of software, both in ICT lesson and across the curriculum. Our aim is also to equip students with the ability to use technological tools to find, explore, analyse, exchange and present information creatively and responsibly.

 

By following a progressive and innovative Computer science and ICT curriculum, students will develop the expertise and confidence to use ICT across a broad range of activities. Outside of formal teaching, students have access to well-resourced, modern computer suites where they are encouraged to work independently, using facilities for presentation of work in a range of subjects and for research. All students have their own email address and access to the internet.

 

Key Stage 3
Throughout years 7, 8 and 9 students study a wide range of topics and skills and gain exposure to a range of innovative technologies.

 

These include:

  • E-safety
  • Databases
  • Spreadsheets
  • Desktop Publishing
  • Animated Presentations
  • Graphics Editing
  • Game making
  • Programming
     

Key Stage 4
At Key Stage 4 we offer one course:

  • OCR GCSE Computer science

 

Computer Science GCSE – OCR
The course consists of three components:

Component:

Marks

Duration

Weighting

Computer Systems (01)

80

1 hours 30 mins

50%

Computational thinking, algorithms and programming (02)

80

1 hours 30 mins

50%

Programming project (03)

-

20 hours

0%

Component 1 and 2 are assessed by written exams, each worth 50% of the GCSE. The Component 3 is a non-exam assessment where students are required to spend 20 hours producing a solution to an exam board set programming scenario. The solution is then sent to the exam board as evidence.

  • Component 1 Computer systems– Exam 50%
    • Systems Architecture
    • Memory
    • Storage
    • Wired and Wireless networks
    • Network topologies, protocols and layers
    • System security
    • System software
    • Ethical, legal, cultural and environmental concerns.

 

  • Component 2 Computational thinking, algorithms and programming – Exam 50%
    • Algorithms
    • Programming techniques.
    • Producing robust programs
    • Computational logic
    • Translators and facilities of languages
    • Data representation

 

  • Unit 3 Programming Project – NEA
    • Programming Techniques
    • Analysis
    • Design
    • Development
    • Testing & Evaluation

 

Key Stage 5
At Key Stage 5 we offer one course:

 

OCR A Level Computer Science

OCR A Level Computer Science consists of three components:

Component:

Marks

Duration

Weighting

Computer Systems (01)

140

2 hours 30 mins

40%

Algorithms and programming (02)

140

2 hours 30 mins

40%

Programming project (03)

70

-

20%

 

 

Component 1: Computer Systems

  • The characteristics of contemporary processors, input, ouput and storage devices.
  • Types of software and the different methodologies used to develop software.
  • Data exchange between different systems
  • Data types, data structures and algorithms
  • Legal, moral, cultural and ethical issues

Component 2: Algorithms and programming

  • What is meant by computational thinking (thinking abstractly, thinking ahead, thinking procedurally etc.)
  • Problem solving and programming - how computers and programs can be used to solve problems.
  • Algorithms and how they can be used to describe and solve problems

Component 3: Programming project

  • Students are expected to apply the principles of computational thinking to a practical coding programming project.
  • They will analyse, design, develop, test, evaluate and document a program written in a suitable programming language.
  • The project is designed to be independently chosen by the student and provides them with the flexibility to investigate projects within the diverse field of computer science.

Prior Knowledge

For A Level Computer Science, students should have completed the GCSE Computing course to a Grade C or above and have a Grade B or above in GCSE Maths